georgiangentility:

Secessionville Manor, built 1837 James Island, SC

georgiangentility:

Secessionville Manor, built 1837 
James Island, SC

southcarolinadove:

On this day in 1754, Banastre Tarleton is born as the fourth child of John Tarleton, the former lord mayor of Liverpool, and a money lender, merchant and slave trader. After completing his education at Oxford, Tarleton became the most feared officer in the British army during the War for American Independence, memorialized in portraits by Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough, as well as on film in The Patriot (2000), starring Mel Gibson, as the basis for the character Colonel William Tavington. The treatment of Patriot prisoners by Tarleton and his Loyalist troops in the Southern Campaign led to the coining of a phrase that came to define British brutality during of the last years of the War for Independence: “Tarleton’s Quarter.”After the surrender of Charleston, South Carolina, on May 12, 1780, the 3rd Virginia, commanded by Colonel Abraham Buford, was virtually the only organized Patriot formation remaining in South Carolina; Colonel Tarleton had been given the mission to destroy any colonial resistance in the state. At Waxhaws on the North Carolina border, a cavalry charge by Tarleton’s men broke the 350 remaining Patriots under Buford. Tarleton and his Tories proceeded to shoot at the Patriots after their surrender, a move that spawned the term “Tarleton’s Quarter,” which in the eyes of the Patriots meant a brutal death at the hands of a cowardly foe. The Continentals lost 113 killed and 203 captured in the Battle of Waxhaws; British losses totaled 19 men and 31 horses killed or wounded. Although they were routed, the loss became a propaganda victory for the Continentals, as wavering Carolina civilians terrified of Tarleton and their Loyalist neighbors were now prepared to rally to the Patriot cause.
From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

southcarolinadove:

On this day in 1754, Banastre Tarleton is born as the fourth child of John Tarleton, the former lord mayor of Liverpool, and a money lender, merchant and slave trader. 
After completing his education at Oxford, Tarleton became the most feared officer in the British army during the War for American Independence, memorialized in portraits by Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough, as well as on film in The Patriot (2000), starring Mel Gibson, as the basis for the character Colonel William Tavington. The treatment of Patriot prisoners by Tarleton and his Loyalist troops in the Southern Campaign led to the coining of a phrase that came to define British brutality during of the last years of the War for Independence: “Tarleton’s Quarter.”
After the surrender of Charleston, South Carolina, on May 12, 1780, the 3rd Virginia, commanded by Colonel Abraham Buford, was virtually the only organized Patriot formation remaining in South Carolina; Colonel Tarleton had been given the mission to destroy any colonial resistance in the state. At Waxhaws on the North Carolina border, a cavalry charge by Tarleton’s men broke the 350 remaining Patriots under Buford. Tarleton and his Tories proceeded to shoot at the Patriots after their surrender, a move that spawned the term “Tarleton’s Quarter,” which in the eyes of the Patriots meant a brutal death at the hands of a cowardly foe. The Continentals lost 113 killed and 203 captured in the Battle of Waxhaws; British losses totaled 19 men and 31 horses killed or wounded. Although they were routed, the loss became a propaganda victory for the Continentals, as wavering Carolina civilians terrified of Tarleton and their Loyalist neighbors were now prepared to rally to the Patriot cause.

From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

john-laurens:

Look at John Laurens’s grave and be sad with me.

(from here)

plantersinn:

A postcard from #Charleston: Here is a scene from our lovely #PlantersInn courtyard. Good morning!

plantersinn:

A postcard from #Charleston: Here is a scene from our lovely #PlantersInn courtyard. Good morning!

hueandeyephotography:

Curving Porch, Sottile House, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC
© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved
hue and eye
the peacock’s hiccup

hueandeyephotography:

Curving Porch, Sottile House, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC

© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved

hue and eye

the peacock’s hiccup

(Source: hueandeye.blogspot.com)

southcarolinadove:

August 20th 1780, Benbow’s Ferry [South Carolina]British Maj. James Wemyss destroyed many homes, killed cattle and sheep, in this small community.
From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

southcarolinadove:

August 20th 1780, Benbow’s Ferry [South Carolina]
British Maj. James Wemyss destroyed many homes, killed cattle and sheep, in this small community.

From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

(Source: l-e-v)

bantarleton:

Details of the siege of Charlestown, 1780. 

bantarleton:

Detail of Lt. Colonel Banastre Tarleton from the action at Cowpens, January 17th 1781. 

stayclassytn:

Charleston, SC

stayclassytn:

Charleston, SC

southcarolinadove:

The Revolutionary War generals of South Carolina, General Francis Marion, General Thomas Pinckney, General (Colonel then) William Washington, General Thomas Sumter, and General Andrew Pickens

One of the most awesome images ever!!

southcarolinadove:

The Revolutionary War generals of South Carolina, General Francis Marion, General Thomas Pinckney, General (Colonel then) William Washington, General Thomas Sumter, and General Andrew Pickens

One of the most awesome images ever!!

southcarolinadove:

General Francis Marion

southcarolinadove:

General Francis Marion

imalegionnaire:

An engraving showing the wounded Baron de Kalb

imalegionnaire:

An engraving showing the wounded Baron de Kalb

southcarolinadove:

August 16th 1781, Santee RiverCol. Isaac Hayne had been captured at Horse Shoe in July and brought to Charlestown for trial. He was found guilty by the British of violating his parole and was hanged for treason on August 4th. Hayne instantly became a martyr to the Patriot cause and his name was a new rallying cry for all South Carolinian Patriots. Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene wrote the British in Charlestown “that retaliation shall immediately take place, not on the tory militia officers, but it shall fall on the heads of regular British officers.”Soon thereafter, Maj. Gen. Greene ordered Brig. Gen. Francis Marion to strike at the enemy’s lines of communications down to Charlestown.Brig. Gen. Francis Marion in turn sent Col. John Ervin to disrupt communications along the Santee River. Col. Ervin captured an enemy convoy south of the Santee River and took Capt. Campbell, two other British officers, and a private prisoner. Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene confined these prisoners to the camp provost for possible reprisal for the recent death of Patriot Col. Isaac Hayne.
From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

southcarolinadove:

August 16th 1781, Santee River
Col. Isaac Hayne had been captured at Horse Shoe in July and brought to Charlestown for trial. He was found guilty by the British of violating his parole and was hanged for treason on August 4th. Hayne instantly became a martyr to the Patriot cause and his name was a new rallying cry for all South Carolinian Patriots. Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene wrote the British in Charlestown “that retaliation shall immediately take place, not on the tory militia officers, but it shall fall on the heads of regular British officers.”
Soon thereafter, Maj. Gen. Greene ordered Brig. Gen. Francis Marion to strike at the enemy’s lines of communications down to Charlestown.
Brig. Gen. Francis Marion in turn sent Col. John Ervin to disrupt communications along the Santee River. Col. Ervin captured an enemy convoy south of the Santee River and took Capt. Campbell, two other British officers, and a private prisoner. Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene confined these prisoners to the camp provost for possible reprisal for the recent death of Patriot Col. Isaac Hayne.

From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page