usnatarchives:

Benjamin Lincoln was an American army officer who served as a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He is notable for his involvement in three major surrenders during the war: Battle of Saratoga, 1780 Siege of Charleston, and the British surrender at Yorktown. The sword Lincoln is sporting is depicted in typical army officers’ fashion. Army officers typically carried two different swords. One is used for full dress—mostly ceremonial in character, as in this picture—and the other used primarily in hand-to-hand combat. National Archives Identifier: 530962

usnatarchives:

Benjamin Lincoln was an American army officer who served as a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He is notable for his involvement in three major surrenders during the war: Battle of Saratoga, 1780 Siege of Charleston, and the British surrender at Yorktown. The sword Lincoln is sporting is depicted in typical army officers’ fashion. Army officers typically carried two different swords. One is used for full dress—mostly ceremonial in character, as in this picture—and the other used primarily in hand-to-hand combat. National Archives Identifier: 530962

draytonhall:

Drayton family historical marker
Drayton Hall, Charleston S.C.

draytonhall:

Drayton family historical marker

Drayton Hall, Charleston S.C.

bantarleton:

Detail of Lt. Colonel Banastre Tarleton from the action at Cowpens, January 17th 1781. 

(Source: sororitysugar)

allabouthistory76:

Since I keep seeing Edward Rutledge today…

Charleston, South Carolina

The Citadel’s “Big Red” Flag Rediscovered
southcarolinadove:

southcarolinadove:

The 800 year old oak tree in Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, SC

Some people have been confusing this with the Angel Oak, but this is NOT the Angel Oak, please read the caption!

southcarolinadove:

southcarolinadove:

The 800 year old oak tree in Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, SC

Some people have been confusing this with the Angel Oak, but this is NOT the Angel Oak, please read the caption!

webofhistory:

A child laborer in a mill in Newberry, SC in 1908.  Here is the description that goes with the photo: 
"A little spinner in the Mollohan Mills, Newberry, S.C. She was tending her ‘sides’ like a veteran, but after I took the photo, the overseer came up and said in an apologetic tone that was pathetic, ‘She just happened in.’ Then a moment later he repeated the information. The mills appear to be full of youngsters that ‘just happened in,’ or ‘are helping sister.’"
Photo by Lewis H. HIne

webofhistory:

A child laborer in a mill in Newberry, SC in 1908.  Here is the description that goes with the photo: 

"A little spinner in the Mollohan Mills, Newberry, S.C. She was tending her ‘sides’ like a veteran, but after I took the photo, the overseer came up and said in an apologetic tone that was pathetic, ‘She just happened in.’ Then a moment later he repeated the information. The mills appear to be full of youngsters that ‘just happened in,’ or ‘are helping sister.’"

Photo by Lewis H. HIne

(Source: Wikipedia)

southcarolinadove:

Phoebe Yates Levy was born on August 18, 1823. She was the fourth of six daughters of a prosperous and socially prominent Jewish family in Charleston, South Carolina. Her father was a successful merchant and her mother was a popular actress.Members of Phoebe’s family were quite active in public life during the war. Her sister, Eugenia Levy Phillips, a Confederate spy, and was banished to an island. Her brother, Samuel, was the highest ranking Jewish officer in Savannah. The family’s wealth enabled them to gain acceptance in the community, which wasn’t easy for Jews. They moved among Charleston’s elite until a series of financial setbacks sent them to Savannah, Georgia, in 1850. Phoebe was then 27 years old and wanted a life of her own. She married Thomas Pember, a non-Jew, in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1856. Soon after the wedding, Thomas contracted tuberculosis, and the couple moved to the South, hoping his health would improve there. On July 9, 1861, Thomas died of tuberculosis in Aiken, South Carolina. He was 36 years old. Widowed and childless, Phoebe returned to her family, who had fled to Marietta, Georgia, to escape the ravages of war. In November 1862, Mrs. George Randolph, wife of the Confederate Secretary of War, offered Phoebe a position as a matron at the Chimborazo Hospital, a Confederate military hospital outside of Richmond, Virginia. Though Phoebe had no professional medical training, she believed that caring for her husband through years of illness qualified her for hospital work.Chimborazo was said to be the largest military hospital in the world at that time. A complex of long, one-story whitewashed buildings sprawled atop a hill, the hospital began receiving patients in 1862 and was eventually expanded to 150 wards. Each ward was a separate building, thirty feet wide and one hundred feet long, and housed approximately forty to sixty patients. Phoebe supervised 150 wards, and an estimated 15,000 soldiers were under her care during the Civil War. On December 1, 1862, 39-year-old Phoebe Yates Pember became the chief matron of the Second Division at Chimborazo, which was one of five divisions in the hospital. Though plagued by shortages of medicine and supplies, and having to contend with doctors who didn’t approve of female nurses, Phoebe cared for sick and wounded Confederate soldiers for the balance of the war. Phoebe remained at Chimborazo until the Confederate surrender in April, 1865. She stayed with her patients after the fall of Richmond and until the facility was taken over by Federal authorities. During that time, she cared for both Confederate and Union soldiers. A total of 76,000 patients had been cared for at Chimborazo by the end of the Civil War.When her responsibilities in Richmond were completed, Phoebe returned to Savannah, Georgia. There, she maintained her elite social status, and traveled extensively in the United States and Europe. She was honored by Confederate veterans’ organizations during her later years. Phoebe Yates Pember died on March 4, 1913, at the age of 89, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She was buried in Laurel Grove Cemetery in Savannah. An obelisk was later erected there in her memory.
From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

southcarolinadove:

Phoebe Yates Levy was born on August 18, 1823. She was the fourth of six daughters of a prosperous and socially prominent Jewish family in Charleston, South Carolina. Her father was a successful merchant and her mother was a popular actress.
Members of Phoebe’s family were quite active in public life during the war. Her sister, Eugenia Levy Phillips, a Confederate spy, and was banished to an island. Her brother, Samuel, was the highest ranking Jewish officer in Savannah. The family’s wealth enabled them to gain acceptance in the community, which wasn’t easy for Jews. They moved among Charleston’s elite until a series of financial setbacks sent them to Savannah, Georgia, in 1850. Phoebe was then 27 years old and wanted a life of her own. She married Thomas Pember, a non-Jew, in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1856. Soon after the wedding, Thomas contracted tuberculosis, and the couple moved to the South, hoping his health would improve there. On July 9, 1861, Thomas died of tuberculosis in Aiken, South Carolina. He was 36 years old. Widowed and childless, Phoebe returned to her family, who had fled to Marietta, Georgia, to escape the ravages of war. In November 1862, Mrs. George Randolph, wife of the Confederate Secretary of War, offered Phoebe a position as a matron at the Chimborazo Hospital, a Confederate military hospital outside of Richmond, Virginia. Though Phoebe had no professional medical training, she believed that caring for her husband through years of illness qualified her for hospital work.
Chimborazo was said to be the largest military hospital in the world at that time. A complex of long, one-story whitewashed buildings sprawled atop a hill, the hospital began receiving patients in 1862 and was eventually expanded to 150 wards. Each ward was a separate building, thirty feet wide and one hundred feet long, and housed approximately forty to sixty patients. Phoebe supervised 150 wards, and an estimated 15,000 soldiers were under her care during the Civil War. On December 1, 1862, 39-year-old Phoebe Yates Pember became the chief matron of the Second Division at Chimborazo, which was one of five divisions in the hospital. Though plagued by shortages of medicine and supplies, and having to contend with doctors who didn’t approve of female nurses, Phoebe cared for sick and wounded Confederate soldiers for the balance of the war. Phoebe remained at Chimborazo until the Confederate surrender in April, 1865. She stayed with her patients after the fall of Richmond and until the facility was taken over by Federal authorities. During that time, she cared for both Confederate and Union soldiers. A total of 76,000 patients had been cared for at Chimborazo by the end of the Civil War.
When her responsibilities in Richmond were completed, Phoebe returned to Savannah, Georgia. There, she maintained her elite social status, and traveled extensively in the United States and Europe. She was honored by Confederate veterans’ organizations during her later years. Phoebe Yates Pember died on March 4, 1913, at the age of 89, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She was buried in Laurel Grove Cemetery in Savannah. An obelisk was later erected there in her memory.

From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

southcarolinadove:

minutemanworld:

General William Moultrie was commander of forces in South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. In 1776 he commanded a fort on Sullivan’s Island in Charleston that successfully defeated a British naval expedition. When Charleston fell in 1780 he was taken captive and later exchanged for General John Burgoyne.

MOULTRIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

southcarolinadove:

minutemanworld:

General William Moultrie was commander of forces in South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. In 1776 he commanded a fort on Sullivan’s Island in Charleston that successfully defeated a British naval expedition. When Charleston fell in 1780 he was taken captive and later exchanged for General John Burgoyne.

MOULTRIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(Source: nps.gov)

southcarolinadove:

minutemanworld:

Map drawn by British engineers during the siege of Charleston in 1780. The map shows the details of various American defenses. The city would be surrendered on May 12, 1780.

CHARLESTON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

southcarolinadove:

minutemanworld:

Map drawn by British engineers during the siege of Charleston in 1780. The map shows the details of various American defenses. The city would be surrendered on May 12, 1780.

CHARLESTON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(Source: Wikipedia)

holycityrambler:

South Carolina Canal and Railroad Company Schedule, 1841

holycityrambler:

South Carolina Canal and Railroad Company Schedule, 1841

zafira66:

Charleston, South Carolina, USA

zafira66:

Charleston, South Carolina, USA

visitheworld:

The way through the marshes, Congaree National Park / USA (by wsweet321).

visitheworld:

The way through the marshes, Congaree National Park / USA (by wsweet321).