southcarolinadove:

"Bony Conraro Angles!" (translation "Good English comrades!"
"Hiddy Doddy Comorado Angles Westoe Skorrye" (loosely translated as "Englis very good good friends, Westoes are naught"
These are the first words spoken by Native Americans (the Kiawah tribe) to the first English settlers upon landing in the colony of Carolina (near Bulls Island, South Carolina), March 1670, the Natives knew broken Spanish from earlier Spanish settlers, the Westoes were a neighboring tribe that were the Kiawahs enemy

southcarolinadove:

"Bony Conraro Angles!" (translation "Good English comrades!"

"Hiddy Doddy Comorado Angles Westoe Skorrye" (loosely translated as "Englis very good good friends, Westoes are naught"

These are the first words spoken by Native Americans (the Kiawah tribe) to the first English settlers upon landing in the colony of Carolina (near Bulls Island, South Carolina), March 1670, the Natives knew broken Spanish from earlier Spanish settlers, the Westoes were a neighboring tribe that were the Kiawahs enemy

August 1st 1776, Seneca TownAfter the Cherokee Attack in July, Maj. Andrew Williamson mustered his Ninety-Six District Militia and marched 1,100 men to punish the Cherokees. Because of all the different commissions, there was considerable confusion over who would command the combined forces. By all rights, Williamson should have been made a Colonel, while many others of lesser stature and military sense in and around the Ninety-Six District (which had been sub-divided by the Provincial Congress) were already commissioned as colonels, this made things difficult for him. On August 1, Maj. Andrew Williamson was leading an expedition against a band of Cherokees, commanded by Alexander Cameron. Williamson’s force was attacked in the early morning by a superior Indian force. The Patriots were forced to withdraw and would have been annihilated if not for Capt. Leroy Hammond. Hammond arrived with his mounted cavalry and made a charge into the Indians. This forced the Indian advance to halt. The Patriots were then able to retreat in good order.
From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

August 1st 1776, Seneca Town
After the Cherokee Attack in July, Maj. Andrew Williamson mustered his Ninety-Six District Militia and marched 1,100 men to punish the Cherokees. Because of all the different commissions, there was considerable confusion over who would command the combined forces. By all rights, Williamson should have been made a Colonel, while many others of lesser stature and military sense in and around the Ninety-Six District (which had been sub-divided by the Provincial Congress) were already commissioned as colonels, this made things difficult for him. On August 1, Maj. Andrew Williamson was leading an expedition against a band of Cherokees, commanded by Alexander Cameron. Williamson’s force was attacked in the early morning by a superior Indian force. The Patriots were forced to withdraw and would have been annihilated if not for Capt. Leroy Hammond. Hammond arrived with his mounted cavalry and made a charge into the Indians. This forced the Indian advance to halt. The Patriots were then able to retreat in good order.

From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

southcarolinadove:

August 1st 1780, Green SpringAccount from Benson J. Lossing in his Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution [with minor edits]: While Ferguson was in the Spartanburg District and on his way toward Gilbert Town in Rutherford County, NC, a detachment of his army had a severe skirmish with Col. Elijah Clarke at Green Springs. Col. Clarke and his company, some two hundred in number, had stopped at the plantation of Capt. James Dillard (Little River District Regiment), who was with them, and, after partaking of refreshments, proceeded to Green Springs.The same evening, Ferguson arrived at Dillard’s, whose wife soon learned from the conversation of some of his men that they knew where Col. Clarke was encamped and intended to surprise him that night. She hastily prepared supper for Ferguson and his men and while they were eating she stole from the room, bridled a young horse, and without a saddle rode to the encampment of Clarke, and warned him of the impending danger.In an instant every man was at his post and prepared for the enemy. Very soon, Col. Dunlap with 200 mounted men sent by Ferguson fell upon Col. Clarke’s camp. Day had not yet dawned and the enemy was greatly surprised and disconcerted when they found the Americans fully prepared to meet them. For fifteen minutes the conflict raged desparately in the gloom, when the Loyalists were repulsed with great slaughter, their survirors hastening back to Ferguson’s camp.
From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook Page

southcarolinadove:

August 1st 1780, Green Spring
Account from Benson J. Lossing in his Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution [with minor edits]: 
While Ferguson was in the Spartanburg District and on his way toward Gilbert Town in Rutherford County, NC, a detachment of his army had a severe skirmish with Col. Elijah Clarke at Green Springs. Col. Clarke and his company, some two hundred in number, had stopped at the plantation of Capt. James Dillard (Little River District Regiment), who was with them, and, after partaking of refreshments, proceeded to Green Springs.
The same evening, Ferguson arrived at Dillard’s, whose wife soon learned from the conversation of some of his men that they knew where Col. Clarke was encamped and intended to surprise him that night. She hastily prepared supper for Ferguson and his men and while they were eating she stole from the room, bridled a young horse, and without a saddle rode to the encampment of Clarke, and warned him of the impending danger.
In an instant every man was at his post and prepared for the enemy. Very soon, Col. Dunlap with 200 mounted men sent by Ferguson fell upon Col. Clarke’s camp. Day had not yet dawned and the enemy was greatly surprised and disconcerted when they found the Americans fully prepared to meet them. For fifteen minutes the conflict raged desparately in the gloom, when the Loyalists were repulsed with great slaughter, their survirors hastening back to Ferguson’s camp.

From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook Page

Aug. 1st 1781, Cunningham’s RaidLoyalist militia under the command of Maj. William “Bloody Bill” Cuningham attacked and dispersed local Patriot militia under Capt. Andrew Barry (Roebuck’s Battalion of Spartan Regiment) in what is today Laurens County [South Carolina] - location currently unknown to the Author.
From Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

Aug. 1st 1781, Cunningham’s Raid
Loyalist militia under the command of Maj. William “Bloody Bill” Cuningham attacked and dispersed local Patriot militia under Capt. Andrew Barry (Roebuck’s Battalion of Spartan Regiment) in what is today Laurens County [South Carolina] - location currently unknown to the Author.

From Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

southcarolinadove:

This is a 6 foot cardboard cut out of General Francis Marion, I need this, lol, if only it wasn’t $70

southcarolinadove:

This is a 6 foot cardboard cut out of General Francis Marion, I need this, lol, if only it wasn’t $70

iheartsouthcarolina:

Introducing the “I Heart South Carolina” brand from STUDIO EI8HT ZERO. While this little icon has been around for a while now, it has not had an official launch. Until the web site is completed, this blog is the place to hear all about what is in store for those who love South Carolina. Visit www.fortheloveofstate.com for more details (Coming Soon).

iheartsouthcarolina:

Introducing the “I Heart South Carolina” brand from STUDIO EI8HT ZERO. While this little icon has been around for a while now, it has not had an official launch. Until the web site is completed, this blog is the place to hear all about what is in store for those who love South Carolina. Visit www.fortheloveofstate.com for more details (Coming Soon).

southcarolinadove:

I need this pillow badly

southcarolinadove:

I need this pillow badly

southcarolinadove:

Lucy Petway Holcombe Pickens, circa early 1850s
"Charming, is not the word to describe her manner; that applies only to the present. It is ‘fascination„ for that has a kind of enchantment that lives even in absence. When I say she was free and careless, both in manner and conversation, I do not by any means intend the bold and dashing style, so much affected by our modern belles; everything about her was delicate and refined. Besides, there was a forgetfulness of self, a charity for others, an interest in the happiness of those around her, which you rarely see in a beautiful woman, who is accustomed to homage and admiration as her right. She did and said many things at which others would have hesitated—-but the wrong was in them, not in her. ‘To the pure all things are pure.’ Again, the ancients said, “The gods give the impulse, man the motive.” [She] followed the impulses of a warm true heart, with guileless innocence, never pausing to think if you or I would approve, but strong in the consciousness of good. There was a child-like trust, a generous, open confidence, which gave her character an inimitable charm—-a charm far more touching, more lasting than beauty.”-Lucy Holcombe Pickens writing about herself (the character Mabel) in her book The Free Flag of Cuba

The First Lady of South Carolina from 1860-1863

southcarolinadove:

Lucy Petway Holcombe Pickens, circa early 1850s

"Charming, is not the word to describe her manner; that applies only to the present. It is ‘fascination„ for that has a kind of enchantment that lives even in absence. When I say she was free and careless, both in manner and conversation, I do not by any means intend the bold and dashing style, so much affected by our modern belles; everything about her was delicate and refined. Besides, there was a forgetfulness of self, a charity for others, an interest in the happiness of those around her, which you rarely see in a beautiful woman, who is accustomed to homage and admiration as her right. She did and said many things at which others would have hesitated—-but the wrong was in them, not in her. ‘To the pure all things are pure.’ Again, the ancients said, “The gods give the impulse, man the motive.” [She] followed the impulses of a warm true heart, with guileless innocence, never pausing to think if you or I would approve, but strong in the consciousness of good. There was a child-like trust, a generous, open confidence, which gave her character an inimitable charm—-a charm far more touching, more lasting than beauty.”

-Lucy Holcombe Pickens writing about herself (the character Mabel) in her book The Free Flag of Cuba

The First Lady of South Carolina from 1860-1863

iheartsouthcarolina:

The Official “I Heart South Carolina” logo. Now you can show just how much you love South Carolina, without having to say a word.

iheartsouthcarolina:

The Official “I Heart South Carolina” logo. Now you can show just how much you love South Carolina, without having to say a word.

iheartsouthcarolina:

The Official “I Heart South Carolina” logo. Now you can show just how much you love South Carolina, without having to say a word.

iheartsouthcarolina:

The Official “I Heart South Carolina” logo. Now you can show just how much you love South Carolina, without having to say a word.

iheartsouthcarolina:

Our very first “Two for Tuesday” is happening right now. Head on over to the shop and buy 1 “I Heart SC” koozie and get the 2nd free. Just place your order and let us know what 2 colors you would like (blue, garnet or orange). www.etsy.com/shop/studioeighty

iheartsouthcarolina:

Our very first “Two for Tuesday” is happening right now. Head on over to the shop and buy 1 “I Heart SC” koozie and get the 2nd free. Just place your order and let us know what 2 colors you would like (blue, garnet or orange). www.etsy.com/shop/studioeighty

southcarolinadove:

Than to be in Carolina!!

southcarolinadove:

Than to be in Carolina!!

draytonhall:

Circa 1869, this stereograph is the last known depiction of Drayton Hall with basement windows and shows the house undergoing a possible restoration. Image by G.N. Barnard, courtesy of the Drayton Hall Photograph Collection. (via New Light to an Old Space: Basement Window Project at Drayton Hall « The Drayton Hall Diaries)

draytonhall:

Circa 1869, this stereograph is the last known depiction of Drayton Hall with basement windows and shows the house undergoing a possible restoration. Image by G.N. Barnard, courtesy of the Drayton Hall Photograph Collection. (via New Light to an Old Space: Basement Window Project at Drayton Hall « The Drayton Hall Diaries)

The First Gentlewoman of Her Time

Theodosia Bartow Burr was born on June 21, 1783. Her parents, Aaron Burr and Theodosia Bartow Prevost Burr, met in 1778 at the Hermitage, the Prevost family seat in Paramus, New Jersey. They were married in 1782 and had four children, of which only Theodosia survived to adulthood. She was given a rigorous education, befitting her parents’ belief that women and men had equal intellectual capabilities. By the time Theodosia was ten, she could read and write French, Greek, and Latin; she studied classics, mathematics, and geography, while also receiving instruction in ballet and skating. When Theodosia Prevost Burr died in 1794, her young daughter became the mistress of Richmond Hill, her father’s estate, hosting such dignitaries as George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Jackson, and Joseph Brant.

In 1801, Theodosia married Joseph Alston, a wealthy South Carolina planter. They had one son, Aaron Burr Alston. The Alston family remained loyal to the elder Aaron Burr throughout the turbulence of his political career, and stayed with him in Richmond, Virginia during his 1807 trial for treason. Theodosia’s health worsened during the years of Burr’s self-imposed European exile, during which he kept a diary for his beloved daughter; she had long suffered from many of the same ailments as her mother. After Burr’s return to America and the death of her son in 1812, Theodosia made plans to travel to New York aboard the Patriot to visit her father. The ship was lost off the North Carolina coast in a violent storm. To her devastated father, this was the event that “separated him from the human race.”

(Source: elizajumel)

southcarolinadove:

todaysdocument:

On the run in Chicago, gangster John Dillinger was cornered by Federal agents outside a theater and killed eighty years ago on July 22, 1934.  

This dramatic re-enactment is courtesy of the film “Your FBI,” from the series: Motion Picture Films and Video RecordingsRecords of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Don’t care for re-enactments? See Dillinger’s actual personal effects in our previous post, from the Universal Newsreel of July 23, 1934.

He was hunted down by the famous G-man, Melvin Purvis, native of Florence, South Carolina. I was out at his grave just a few days ago.