southcarolinadove:

A 1780 map of South Carolina and Georgia during the American Revolution

southcarolinadove:

A 1780 map of South Carolina and Georgia during the American Revolution

southcarolinadove:

A 1776 map of Fort Sullivan, now called Fort Moultrie

southcarolinadove:

A 1776 map of Fort Sullivan, now called Fort Moultrie

southcarolinadove:

A 1775 map of North and South Carolina

southcarolinadove:

A 1775 map of North and South Carolina

southcarolinadove:

A 1779 map of South Carolina

southcarolinadove:

A 1779 map of South Carolina

kamigarcia:

Reminds me of Gatlin. Which characters are you most excited to see again in #DangerousCreatures?

kamigarcia:

Reminds me of Gatlin. Which characters are you most excited to see again in #DangerousCreatures?

todaysdocument:

Store for FreedmenUnion troops successfully occupied the area around Beaufort, South Carolina, in 1862. Even though the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, or Freedman’s Bureau, was not created until March 3, 1865, Union victories along the coast offered newly freed slaves support from the Federal Government. This photograph, taken by Sam A. Cooley on December 18, 1864, shows a store for freedmen in Beaufort.

Photograph of Store for Freedmen in Beaufort, South Carolina, 12/13/1864

via DocsTeach

todaysdocument:

Store for Freedmen
Union troops successfully occupied the area around Beaufort, South Carolina, in 1862. Even though the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, or Freedman’s Bureau, was not created until March 3, 1865, Union victories along the coast offered newly freed slaves support from the Federal Government. This photograph, taken by Sam A. Cooley on December 18, 1864, shows a store for freedmen in Beaufort.

Photograph of Store for Freedmen in Beaufort, South Carolina, 12/13/1864

via DocsTeach

(Source: research.archives.gov)

southcarolinadove:

1779 map of South Carolina

southcarolinadove:

1779 map of South Carolina

southcarolinadove:

South Carolina’s Revolutionary War heros, General Francis Marion, General Thomas Pinckney, General William Washington, General Thomas Sumter, and General Andrew Pickens

southcarolinadove:

South Carolina’s Revolutionary War heros, General Francis Marion, General Thomas Pinckney, General William Washington, General Thomas Sumter, and General Andrew Pickens

southcarolinadove:

The sabal palmetto, by Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius, the sabal palmetto is the state tree of South Carolina, usually just referred to as a palmetto tree

southcarolinadove:

The sabal palmetto, by Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius, the sabal palmetto is the state tree of South Carolina, usually just referred to as a palmetto tree

fycharleston:

Empty MarketNorth & South Market Street 

fycharleston:

Empty Market
North & South Market Street 

(Source: Flickr / bulebushphotography)

fycharleston:

Memorial to Pierre G.T. Beauregard, Confederate General, who defended Charleston during the Civil WarWashington Square, corner of Meeting and Broad Streets 

fycharleston:

Memorial to Pierre G.T. Beauregard, Confederate General, who defended Charleston during the Civil War
Washington Square, corner of Meeting and Broad Streets 

(Source: flickr.com)

On this day in 1857, the Central America sank in a storm off the coast of Carolina. The SS Central America, known as the Ship of Gold, was a 280-foot (85 m) sidewheel steamer that operated between Central America and the eastern coast of the United States during the 1850s. It was originally named the SS George Law, after Mr. George Law of New York. The ship sank in a hurricane in September 1857, along with more than 550 passengers and crew and 30,000 pounds (14,000 kg) of gold, contributing to the Panic of 1857.
From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

On this day in 1857, the Central America sank in a storm off the coast of Carolina. The SS Central America, known as the Ship of Gold, was a 280-foot (85 m) sidewheel steamer that operated between Central America and the eastern coast of the United States during the 1850s. It was originally named the SS George Law, after Mr. George Law of New York. The ship sank in a hurricane in September 1857, along with more than 550 passengers and crew and 30,000 pounds (14,000 kg) of gold, contributing to the Panic of 1857.

From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

The 7 biggest differences inbetween the old Charleston and the new Charleston

southcarolinadove:

fycharleston:

Funny and true. 

Lol, this is soo true, I guess I’m part of the Old Charleston

(Source: beelines)

(Source: winyah)