southern-conservatism:

acharlestonstateofmind:

Curving porch, Sottile House, College of Charleston, SC  © Doug Hickok All Rights Reserved

I would KILL for this porch!

southern-conservatism:

acharlestonstateofmind:

Curving porch, Sottile House, College of Charleston, SC  © Doug Hickok All Rights Reserved

I would KILL for this porch!

(Source: hueandeye.blogspot.com)

fycharleston:

Cistern Yard College of Charleston Campus

fycharleston:

Cistern Yard
College of Charleston Campus

(Source: instagram.com)

thehandbookauthority:

fycharleston: Edmonston Alson House, 21 East Battery Street

thehandbookauthority:

fycharleston: Edmonston Alson House, 21 East Battery Street

hueandeyephotography:

Railing at Night, Market Hall, Charleston, SC
© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved
hue and eye daily photo blog
hue and eye tumblr
the peacock’s hiccup, my art blog

hueandeyephotography:

Railing at Night, Market Hall, Charleston, SC

© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved

hue and eye daily photo blog

hue and eye tumblr

the peacock’s hiccup, my art blog

southcarolinadove:

This image of General Francis Marion has always bothered me, he looks like he just broke his wrist from holding that sword and it hurts him, lol

southcarolinadove:

This image of General Francis Marion has always bothered me, he looks like he just broke his wrist from holding that sword and it hurts him, lol

necclibrary:

Today marks the Anniversary of the 54th Massachusetts regiment’s assault on Fort Wagner on July 18, 1863. The above photos show Robert Gould Shaw, Private Abraham F. Brown, the beach approach to Fort Wagner, and the tattered flags of the regiment. 

The movie “Glory” popularized the 54th and its mission, but here are some great sites with more information about these soldiers:

Massachusetts Historical Society - The 54th Regiment

The Civil War Trust - Fort Wagner and the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

National Park Service - Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment

rulesforthesouthernlady:

I could sit on this bench, looking at this view for forever. #draytonhall

rulesforthesouthernlady:

I could sit on this bench, looking at this view for forever. #draytonhall

ripples-on-a-blank-shore:

Charleston Harbour

fycharleston:

Cistern Yard College of Charleston Campus

fycharleston:

Cistern Yard
College of Charleston Campus

(Source: instagram.com)

southcarolinadove:

60-64 Broad St. - The Confederate Home. Behind the exuberant Victorian facade is a double tenement built c. 1800 by Gilbert Chalmers, a master builder, who put a covered passageway through the center of the building. In 1834 the property was purchased by Angus Stewart who operated the Carolina Hotel here. The hotel was subsequently continued by Archibald Mckenzie. He rented the building in 1867 to the Home for the Mothers, Widows, and Daughters of Confederate soldiers, also known as the Confederate Home. The institution was founded in 1867 by Mrs. Mary Amarinthia Snowden and her sister Mrs. Isabell S. Snowden. The two women mortgaged their home to help finance the hone, which filled a need at a desperate time in the history of the area. The building also housed the Confederate College which provided educational opportunities for young ladies until the early 1920s. Dr. Charle S. Vedder, for 50 years pastor of the Huguenot Church, and other individuals taught at the Confederate College without salary. The Confederate Home purchased the property in 1874. The middle section with the cantilevered piazza (having no visible support) was built between 1872 and 1882. The home also took over the for mer United States Court facilities to the rear (see 23-25 Chalmers St.). The building was severely dmmaged in the 1886 earthquake. It was repaired with donations from throughout the country in 1887. At that time, the Victorian facade, with the mansard roof and fanciful dormers,was constructed. The Confederate Home today (1984) is made up of apartments of varying sizes, available mainly to people of retirement age, and a few offices and studios. The former U.S. Court Room and the rear piazza overlooking the large tree-shaded courtyard, are now used for the Home ‘s annual “tea room” in the spring.

From the old Charleston Tour Guide Exam Study book

southcarolinadove:

60-64 Broad St. - The Confederate Home. Behind the exuberant Victorian facade is a double tenement built c. 1800 by Gilbert Chalmers, a master builder, who put a covered passageway through the center of the building. In 1834 the property was purchased by Angus Stewart who operated the Carolina Hotel here. The hotel was subsequently continued by Archibald Mckenzie. He rented the building in 1867 to the Home for the Mothers, Widows, and Daughters of Confederate soldiers, also known as the Confederate Home. The institution was founded in 1867 by Mrs. Mary Amarinthia Snowden and her sister Mrs. Isabell S. Snowden. The two women mortgaged their home to help finance the hone, which filled a need at a desperate time in the history of the area. The building also housed the Confederate College which provided educational opportunities for young ladies until the early 1920s. Dr. Charle S. Vedder, for 50 years pastor of the Huguenot Church, and other individuals taught at the Confederate College without salary. The Confederate Home purchased the property in 1874. The middle section with the cantilevered piazza (having no visible support) was built between 1872 and 1882. The home also took over the for mer United States Court facilities to the rear (see 23-25 Chalmers St.). The building was severely dmmaged in the 1886 earthquake. It was repaired with donations from throughout the country in 1887. At that time, the Victorian facade, with the mansard roof and fanciful dormers,was constructed. The Confederate Home today (1984) is made up of apartments of varying sizes, available mainly to people of retirement age, and a few offices and studios. The former U.S. Court Room and the rear piazza overlooking the large tree-shaded courtyard, are now used for the Home ‘s annual “tea room” in the spring.

From the old Charleston Tour Guide Exam Study book

mossandmarsh:

Saint Helena Island, SC
via G&G

mossandmarsh:

Saint Helena Island, SC

via G&G

hueandeyephotography:

Mansion at Night, Charleston, SC
© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved
hue and eye
the peacock’s hiccup

hueandeyephotography:

Mansion at Night, Charleston, SC

© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved

hue and eye

the peacock’s hiccup

southcarolinadove:

Since Charleston, South Carolina is the “Holy City,” here are a few prominent churches in downtown Charleston

hueandeyephotography:

Ravenel Bridge and Charleston Harbor, Charleston, SC
© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved
hue and eye
the peacock’s hiccup

hueandeyephotography:

Ravenel Bridge and Charleston Harbor, Charleston, SC

© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved

hue and eye

the peacock’s hiccup

hueandeyephotography:

Garden Path, Charleston, SC
© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved
hue and eye
the peacock’s hiccup

hueandeyephotography:

Garden Path, Charleston, SC

© Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved

hue and eye

the peacock’s hiccup